New York

Stolen Picasso – When You’re So Rich You Don’t Notice Your Picasso Is Missing

 

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Gallery Art owner Kenneth Hendel holds on tightly to Picasso’s ‘Portrait de Marie-Therese’ at his gallery in Aventura on Wednesday, April 20, 2016. Hendel received a letter from a New York law firm saying that the Picasso in his gallery was stolen ten years ago from the Tisch family and they just noticed it was missing now. The gallery owner contends he bought the art from another dealer – paid $350,000 for it — and that he knows nothing about it being stolen.
PATRICK FARRELL pfarrell@miamiherald.com

A Living Copy of Vincent van Gogh’s Ear Makes Its New York Debut

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Diemut Strebe, Sugababe (2014). A living bioengineered replica of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, grown from tissue engineered cartilage cells procured from a direct male descendant. Photo: Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Arts.

A little piece of a long-dead artist is coming back to life in New York this fall when Diemut Strebe’s creepy living copy of Vincent van Gogh’s ear makes its New York debut at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts.

Titled Sugababe, the ear was created using genetic samples Strebe collected from Lieuwe van Gogh, the great-great-grandson of Theo van Gogh, the Post-Impressionist artist‘s brother. Strebe used computer imaging technology to recreate the ear’s shape based on its appearance in van Gogh’s self-portraits, and a computer processor the simulates nerve pulses allegedly allows the ear to hear.

Though Sugababe is admittedly macabre, visitors at the original exhibition at the Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, Germany, “loved the ear,” Strebe insisted in an e-mail to artnet News.

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Vincent van Gogh, Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear (1889). Image: Courtesy of Wikipedia.

“I’m not sure that everyone understands the full scientific and biological implications,” the artist writes. “The scientific approach is based on the Theseus’s paradox by Plutarch… He asked if a ship would be the same ship if all its parts were replaced. This paradox is brought into a 21st-century context by using a living cell line (from Lieuwe van Gogh) in which we replaced (at least as a proof of principle) his natural DNA with historical and synthesized DNA.”

Perhaps the most famous detached body part in all of art history, van Gogh allegedly cut off his ear when he had a mental breakdown, although some German historians now think Paul Gauguin may have cut off van Gogh’s ear with a rapier following a heated argument between the two artists, according to the book Van Goghs Ohr: Paul Gauguin und der Pakt des Schweigens (Van Gogh’s Ear: Paul Gauguin and the Pact of Silence). Though the ear has been recreated, scientists haven’t been able to slow the fading of van Gogh’s paintings.

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Joseph Beuys, I Like America and America Likes Me (1974). Image: Courtesy of e-flux.com.

The scientifically-minded show also includes Social Sculpture: The Scent of Joseph Beuys, a scent-based piece inspired by the German Fluxus artist’s 1974 performance at RenĂ© Block’s gallery in New York titled, I Like America and America Likes Me. With the help of International Flavors & Fragrances Inc., Strebe has reduced Beuys‘s original work into seven scents, like “gallery” and “coyote,” which are meant to evoke Beuys‘s experience living for a week with a wild coyote in the gallery space.

Diemut Strebe’s “Free Radicals: Sugababe & Other Works” is on view at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, 31 Mercer Street, New York, November 7–December 5, 2015. 

This article originally appeared on artnet News.

What is a COA and why are they important?

Find peace in mind knowing when you shop at GallArt.com that the artwork you purchase is genuine and always comes with a Certificate of Authenticity.

Screen Shot 2015-06-04 at 12.48.22 PMWhat Is a Certificate of Authenticity?

A Certificate of Authenticity is a bit like an artwork’s birth certificate, passport and quality guarantee all rolled into one.

Essentially, a COA is a document, created by the artist or someone who is an expert on the artist, which accompanies an artwork and contains all the information a collector could need to verify if the piece of art is genuine.

A Certificate of Authenticity (COA) provides a lot of concrete detail about a piece, but by existing for a particular piece, it says even more. An artwork that has a COA is one that is made by a professional practicing artist, not an amateur. It is a piece that has collectible value. The Certificate adds a tangible credibility to the work. It can help the work hold its value.

The COA is held to be an indirect promise of quality. Art pieces that have a COA have usually been made by an artist who cares about their work, its longevity and their collectors. The piece is likely to have been created from the best materials available, be designed to last and been created by an expert. Back to the concrete details, the Certificate will provide all the information on the medium(s) of the piece needed for conservation that might otherwise be lost forever.

Certificates protect the artist and the buyer by helping to prove that an artwork is original. Cheap copies sold without an artist’s knowledge or consent is unfortunately common. Without a COA attached, this situation makes it next to impossible for the buyer to be confident of the value of the piece or for the artist to maintain their credibility and their livelihood.

As an art collector, you really must only buy Fine Art pieces that are backed by a Certificate of Authenticity. This helps ensure that what you have bought at a premium is genuine and not counterfeit.

Happy Memorial Day From GallArt.com

For All Those Who Have Served and Are Currently Serving, Thank You. Happy Memorial Day from GallArt.com! Head on over to GallArt.com & our eBay store for our Memorial Day Sale!

Peter Max, Flag with Heart - 1991

Peter Max, Flag with Heart – 1991

Peter Max, Flag - 2013

Peter Max, Flag – 2013

Dave McGary, Strikes with Thunder - 1989

Dave McGary, Strikes with Thunder – 1989

GallArt.com Make an Offer No Reasonable Offer Refused

Head over to GallArt.com to see the amazing collection we have available.

Head over to GallArt.com to see the amazing collection we have available.

Robert Cottingham, Hot - 2009

Robert Cottingham, Hot – 2009

Sam Francis, Untitled - 1984

Sam Francis, Untitled – 1984

Jim Dine, The Bather - 2005

Jim Dine, The Bather – 2005

Robert Rauschenberg , Cage - 1983

Robert Rauschenberg , Cage – 1983

Salvador Dali, Tristan & Isolde - 1972

Salvador Dali, Tristan & Isolde – 1972

The Beginner’s Guide To Buying Art

Zatitsa.com for more tips

Zatitsa.com for more tips

The Galleries

GET A MAP New York is a city of multiplying art districts. Explore them. Bushwick and Williamsburg in Brooklyn, and Long Island City in Queens, are well established as alternative art centers. So is the Lower East Side in Manhattan. But artists and galleries also cluster in Greenpoint, Bedford-Stuyvesant and Gowanus, Brooklyn. Gallery Guide, a free booklet with listings of current exhibitions and neighborhood maps, can be found in many galleries. Online, there’s the Chelsea Gallery Map, and for Brooklyn, the monthly guide Wagmag.

CHECK PAST SALES See if the artist you like has a track record. Artnet sells subscriptions to its price database, which has sales from 1,600 auction houses since 1985.

NEGOTIATE The contract between dealer and artist usually includes a clause permitting the dealer to lower the price of an artwork up to a certain percentage, somewhere between 5 and 20 percent. Remember that the artist gets only half of the listed price. The gallery takes the rest.

DON’T TAKE IT PERSONALLY Some of the higher-end galleries can be snooty, forcing you to ask for price information, which should be visible, and assuming you’re not a serious buyer. Leading dealers also like to place their holdings with established collectors to protect the works’ pedigree, so even if you can afford a major painting, a gallery may not want to sell it to you. Don’t sweat it. Just move on to more welcoming galleries.

WORK THE ANGLES For a higher-priced work, a dealer might agree to installment payments.

LOOK FOR THE RED DOT If an artwork on the wall or on the gallery’s price list (which, by law, must be prominently displayed, though often is not) has a red dot, that means it has been sold.

HAVE A PLAN B If the work you want is too expensive, consider smaller works by the same artist, a work on paper rather than an oil painting, an oil-pastel study, an older work or a photograph. And ask to look in the back room. Most dealers will have additional work by an artist they represent.

“Art doesn’t have to be expensive, but it’s important to be out there and see what’s happening. It may take you six months or a year to find what you like.” Judith Selkowitz (art adviser)

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The Auctions

HIRE AN ART ADVISER There are plenty of people whose job it is to help you buy art, whether it’s just a few decorative pieces or the beginnings of a serious collection. You can find them through online listings, but it’s better to ask your art-buying acquaintances for their advisers or search for names in news articles about collectors and the art market.

READ AND PREVIEW Do your homework. Study the auction catalog — including price estimates — and visit previews for a close-up look at the art on offer. Set a budget and stick to it.

SIT ON YOUR HANDS Auctions can be overwhelming. There is a show-business element to the proceedings, and big names in attendance. You can’t always tell what’s happening — or who’s bidding. That’s because some buyers prefer anonymity so they bid over the phone or from private boxes above the auction room. Also, the bidding can go fast, with auctioneers throwing out several figures in succession to jump-start the process. When in doubt, just watch.

CLICK, WITH CAUTION There are some great deals online and legitimate outfits getting into the act — Sotheby’s recently held its first auction in a new partnership with eBay, and Christie’s in 2012 sold some of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Art’s collection online. But buyers must beware; the online sphere leaves all sorts of room for specious claims about provenance, condition and value. Paddle8 and Auctionata are considered reputable sites. You need to exercise due diligence on sellers and their claims before you click the bidding button.

LOOK AT THE CLOCK Lisa Dennison, the chairwoman of Sotheby’s North and South America, advises bargain hunters to look at the day sales, where “you will find works by many of the same artists in the evening sale, at a fraction of the price.”

At Sotheby’s, an untitled 2009 polyurethanic rubber hand by Maurizio Cattelan is estimated at $15,000 to $20,000 in the day sale on Wednesday, whereas that artist’s piece featuring miniature working elevators (also untitled) from 2001 is estimated at $1.2 million to $1.8 million at the sale the previous evening.

“People get sentimental about the first few works of art they buy, or they find them laughable and use them as benchmarks of their early mistakes. But either way, it’s like first love, and one should totally revel in it.” — Amy Cappellazzo (art adviser)

For the complete Guide on Buying Art, read the full article on NYTimes.com

Semi-Annual Sale Make An Offer All Reasonable Offers Considered

Click here to view our complete Make an Offer flyer.

Head over to GallArt.com to see all that we have to offer.

Head over to GallArt.com to see all that we have to offer.

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Keith Haring – Pop Shop Quad I, 1987

17 x 19.5 inches, Screen print - 2013 152/1000

Andy Warhol (Sunday B. Morning) – Dollar Sign, 2013

Love, 1971

Peter Max – Love, 1971

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Robert Indiana – Love Suite

Sage, 2013

Peter Max – Sage, 2013

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