Artist

A Living Copy of Vincent van Gogh’s Ear Makes Its New York Debut

ear

Diemut Strebe, Sugababe (2014). A living bioengineered replica of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, grown from tissue engineered cartilage cells procured from a direct male descendant. Photo: Courtesy of Ronald Feldman Fine Arts.

A little piece of a long-dead artist is coming back to life in New York this fall when Diemut Strebe’s creepy living copy of Vincent van Gogh’s ear makes its New York debut at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts.

Titled Sugababe, the ear was created using genetic samples Strebe collected from Lieuwe van Gogh, the great-great-grandson of Theo van Gogh, the Post-Impressionist artist‘s brother. Strebe used computer imaging technology to recreate the ear’s shape based on its appearance in van Gogh’s self-portraits, and a computer processor the simulates nerve pulses allegedly allows the ear to hear.

Though Sugababe is admittedly macabre, visitors at the original exhibition at the Centre for Art and Media in Karlsruhe, Germany, “loved the ear,” Strebe insisted in an e-mail to artnet News.

VAN-GOGH-bandaged-ear

Vincent van Gogh, Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear (1889). Image: Courtesy of Wikipedia.

“I’m not sure that everyone understands the full scientific and biological implications,” the artist writes. “The scientific approach is based on the Theseus’s paradox by Plutarch… He asked if a ship would be the same ship if all its parts were replaced. This paradox is brought into a 21st-century context by using a living cell line (from Lieuwe van Gogh) in which we replaced (at least as a proof of principle) his natural DNA with historical and synthesized DNA.”

Perhaps the most famous detached body part in all of art history, van Gogh allegedly cut off his ear when he had a mental breakdown, although some German historians now think Paul Gauguin may have cut off van Gogh’s ear with a rapier following a heated argument between the two artists, according to the book Van Goghs Ohr: Paul Gauguin und der Pakt des Schweigens (Van Gogh’s Ear: Paul Gauguin and the Pact of Silence). Though the ear has been recreated, scientists haven’t been able to slow the fading of van Gogh’s paintings.

COA1XCJVAAAacL_

Joseph Beuys, I Like America and America Likes Me (1974). Image: Courtesy of e-flux.com.

The scientifically-minded show also includes Social Sculpture: The Scent of Joseph Beuys, a scent-based piece inspired by the German Fluxus artist’s 1974 performance at RenĂ© Block’s gallery in New York titled, I Like America and America Likes Me. With the help of International Flavors & Fragrances Inc., Strebe has reduced Beuys‘s original work into seven scents, like “gallery” and “coyote,” which are meant to evoke Beuys‘s experience living for a week with a wild coyote in the gallery space.

Diemut Strebe’s “Free Radicals: Sugababe & Other Works” is on view at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, 31 Mercer Street, New York, November 7–December 5, 2015. 

This article originally appeared on artnet News.

Remembering Robert Mapplethorpe, born this day in 1946.

hc2

Born in Queens, NY, Robert Mapplethorpe attended classes at Parsons School of Design while he was a teenager, working mostly with collage and mixed media. There he met fellow artist and musician Patti Smith, who posed in some of his earliest portraits of famous figures, and developed his love of photography as a medium separate from his collages.

In the late 1960’s he worked as a photographer for Andy Warhol‘s Interview magazine. Mapplethorpe began taking Polaroids of his family, friends, and public personalities regularly, and in the late 1970s, focused primarily on intimate, sexually charged images, which is what brought Mapplethorpe significant critical attention. Mapplethorpe later did a series on female bodybuilder Lisa Lyons, as well as images of dramatic, classical nudes, carefully composed still lifes, and engaging portraits.

In 1986, he was diagnosed with AIDS, and over the next three years, continued to photograph fervently. He also established the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, dedicated to supporting photography and AIDS research. He had his first major American retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1988, just a year before his death

The 12 Most Anticipated Auction Lots Likely to Break Records This Month

Andy Warhol, Mao (1972), will be offered at Sotheby's on November 11.  Estimate: Around $40 million. Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's.

Andy Warhol, Mao (1972), will be offered at Sotheby’s on November 11.
Estimate: Around $40 million.
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Auction houses have been rolling out a steady stream of blockbuster consignments in recent weeks as the art world braces for what is perhaps the biggest trophy season yet. Works on the block include a nine figure Modigliani nude at Christie’s and the $500 million fully guaranteed collection of former Sotheby’s chairman A. Alfred Taubman at Sotheby’s—the highest estimated single-owner sale in history.

It’s a sign of how hot the current market is that buyers are willing to part with a number of rare blue-chip lots while also securing hefty guarantees either directly from the auction houses or via outside guarantors who have stepped up to the plate. One recent report concludes that $1 billion, or roughly half, of the $2 billion worth of art on offer this season has already been sold, due to guarantees.

Christie’s continues to shake up the sale schedule with the addition of another powerhouse hybrid sale of Impressionist and contemporary art, titled “The Artist’s Muse” on Monday November 9, creating a ripple effect of date shifts that will now see Phillips holding the first Sunday evening sale of 20th Century and contemporary art on November 8 to jump-start the week.

Sotheby’s meanwhile is adhering to the traditional model of holding its major Impressionist and modern evening sale in the first week of the month (November 5), although the sheer scope of the Taubman collection—about 500 lots in all—also necessitated an additional evening sale of roughly 75 of the best works. On November 4, “Masterworks: The Collection of A. Alfred Taubman” will open the auction series.

Read on for a selection of highlights, and don’t miss artnet News’ coverage of the highly-anticipated evening sales.

Wednesday, November 4:
Sotheby’s “Masterworks: The Collection of A. Alfred Taubman

Amedeo Modigliani Paulette Jourdain (circa 1919). Estimate: $25–35 million.  Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's.

Amedeo Modigliani Paulette Jourdain (circa 1919).
Estimate: $25–35 million.
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Willem de Kooning, Untitled XXI, (1976). Estimate: $25–35 million. Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's.

Willem de Kooning, Untitled XXI, (1976).
Estimate: $25–35 million.
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Frank Stella Delaware Crossing (1961). Estimate: $8–12 million. Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's.

Frank Stella Delaware Crossing (1961).
Estimate: $8–12 million.
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Sotheby’s is poised to break the auction record for Frank Stella with this mesmerizing example from the Taubman collection: Delaware Crossing (1961) is estimated at $8 million to $12 million. If it makes it to even the low end of the presale estimate, it will have exceeded the current $6.6 million record set for the artist in 2014.

Thursday, November 5:
Sotheby’s Impressionist and Modern Art Evening Sale.

Vincent van Gogh Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé (1889) Estimate: $50–70 million.

Vincent van Gogh Paysage sous un ciel mouvementé (1889)
Estimate: $50–70 million.

Pablo Picasso La Gommeuse (1901) Estimate: In the region of $60 million. Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's.

Pablo Picasso La Gommeuse (1901)
Estimate: In the region of $60 million.
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s.

Sotheby’s Impressionist and modern expert Simon Shaw called this van Gogh landscape the “great jewel” of Belgian collectors Louis and Evelyn Franck, whose collection—which also includes a rare blue period Picasso and important works by James Ensor—is the centerpiece of the Impressionist and evening sale. Van Gogh painted Paysage sous un ciel mouvementĂ© in Arles in 1889, just a month before he checked himself into an asylum at Saint-RĂ©my.

Picasso’s La Gommeuse (1901), which hails from the collection of art and wine aficionado Bill Koch, is a blue period portrait that was painted when the artist was only 19 years old. It also has an intriguing back story including a long-hidden painting underneath the lining that Koch uncovered during conservation efforts in 2000.

Wednesday, November 11:
Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening Sale

Cy Twombly Untitled (New York City) (1968) Estimate: in the region of $60 million Image: Courtesy of Sotheby's

Cy Twombly Untitled (New York City) (1968)
Estimate: in the region of $60 million
Image: Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Sotheby’s is offering a rare Cy Twombly “blackboard” painting this fall—one of the few remaining in private hands—with an asking price around $60 million.

That puts the painting in the running for a potential new auction record for the artist; the current record stands at $69.6 million, which was set in November 2014 at Christie’s New York for another untitled blackboard painting dating from 1970.

Sunday November 8:
Phillips’ 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale

Willem de Kooning Untitled XXVIII (1977)  Estimate: $10–15 million.  Image: Courtesy of Phillips

Willem de Kooning Untitled XXVIII (1977)
Estimate: $10–15 million.
Image: Courtesy of Phillips

Le Corbusier Femme rouge et pelote verte (1932) Estimate: $4–6 million. Image: Courtesy of Phillips

Le Corbusier Femme rouge et pelote verte (1932)
Estimate: $4–6 million.
Image: Courtesy of Phillips

Phillips’ sale will be led by two fresh-to-auction works: Willem de Kooning‘s 1977 abstract was most recently acquired from Gagosian Gallery by the present consignor, and carries an estimate of $10 million to $15 million. The architect Le Corbusier is represented here by the vibrant painting Femme rouge et pelote verte (1932), which was acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, according to Phillips.

Monday, November 9:
Christie’s “The Artist’s Muse” Sale

Amedeo Modigliani Nu Couché (Reclining Nude) (1917-18). Estimate: In the region of $100 million. Image: Courtesy of Christie's

Amedeo Modigliani Nu Couché (Reclining Nude) (1917-18).
Estimate: In the region of $100 million.
Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

Roy Lichtenstein Nurse (1964) Estimate: In the region of $80 million Image: Courtesy of Christie's.

Roy Lichtenstein Nurse (1964)
Estimate: In the region of $80 million
Image: Courtesy of Christie’s.

This Modigliani nude—which has an asking price in the region of $100 million—has generated considerable buzz this fall. It is the centerpiece of Christie’s curated sale “The Artist’s Muse,” and is poised to break the current record for a work by the artist, which is held by TĂŞte (1911-12), a carved stone sculpture that sold for $70.7 million at Sotheby’s this past November.

Tuesday, November 10:
Christie’s Post-War and Contemporary Evening Sale

Louise Bourgeois Spider (conceived in 1996 and executed in 1997).  Estimate: $25-35 million. Image: Courtesy of Christie's.

Louise Bourgeois Spider (conceived in 1996 and executed in 1997).
Estimate: $25-35 million.
Image: Courtesy of Christie’s.

Even with the blockbuster works it placed in its Monday night muse sale, Christie’s still had plenty of firepower left for its evening contemporary sale. Front and center (and also currently standing outside Christie’s Rockefeller Center headquarters in midtown) is Louise Bourgeois‘ monumental Spider (conceived in 1996, and cast in 1997), with an unpublished estimate of $25 million to $35 million.

Lucio Fontana Concetto spaziale la fine (1964) Estimate: In the region of $25 million. Image: Courtesy of Christie's.

Lucio Fontana Concetto spaziale la fine (1964)
Estimate: In the region of $25 million.
Image: Courtesy of Christie’s.

Andy Warhol Four Marilyns (1962)  Estimate: In the region of $40 millon. Image: Courtesy of Christie's.

Andy Warhol Four Marilyns (1962)
Estimate: In the region of $40 millon.
Image: Courtesy of Christie’s.

source via artnet 

Pablo Picasso on his 134th birthday

Pablo Picasso

is one of those artists who gave the arts an entire new definition, just like Vincent Van Gogh and Leonardo Da Vinci. His paintings and artworks have a distinctive style that make them stand out of the crowd and give them an unique identity that fans can easily relate with Picasso.
Born in Spain in 1881 today, Picasso is known across the world as a painter, print maker, sculptor, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright. He spent most of his adult life in France.
Picasso is considered as one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century. Besides his career as an artist, he co-founded the Cubist movement, invented constructed sculpture and co-invented the art style of collage.
Picasso died in 1973 at the age of 91. On the eve of 134th birthday of the legendary artist, here are some of his popular art: at GallArt.com:

Man Arrested for Destroying $120,000 Dale Chihuly Sculpture

CHIHULY yellow sun HIGH RES

A 43-year-old man has been arrested and charged with smashing a $120,000 Dale Chihuly sculpture. The piece was on view at the artist’s retrospective in his hometown at the Tacoma Museum of Art in Washington.

The incident took place on Friday, while the exhibition was closed. The suspect is believed to have knocked over Chihuly‘s Gilded Lavender Ikebana with Lapis Stem and Two Leaves, shattering the delicate blown glass.

Dale Chihuly, Gilded Lavender Ikebana with Lapis Stem and Two Leaves. The sculpture was smashed by a visitor at the Tacoma Art Museum. Photo: Bruce Ikenberry Photography.

“On the video surveillance, the defendant’s arm swung forward and a large amount of breaking colored glass appears on the floor,” wrote deputy prosecutor April McComb, according to the News Tribune.

The man is being held on $20,000 bail, and has pleaded not guilty on the charge of one count of first-degree malicious mischief. He has previously been convicted of malicious mischief, second-degree robbery, and custodial assault, and has a history of felony charges from as far back as 2006.

Installation shot of the Dale Chihuly retrospective at the Tacoma Museum of Art. Photo: Tacoma Museum of Art.

The News Tribune cites court records indicating the defendant has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, antisocial disorder, and bipolar disorder. In the past, he has been involuntarily medicated in order to be able to stand trial.

After vandalizing the Chihuly sculpture, the man reportedly attempted to enter another closed exhibition before being confronted by security. He pulled a fire alarm in his rush to leave the museum, and has also been charged with sounding a false alarm.

Staff members cleaned up the shattered glass, and the museum was able to remain open the rest of the day.

Installation shot of the Dale Chihuly retrospective at the Tacoma Museum of Art. Photo: Tacoma Museum of Art.

This is not the first time Chihuly’s colorful glass artwork has been the victim of criminal activity. This past year, a group of friends scaled the walls of the Denver Botanic Gardens on a drunken whim and made off with four pieces by the Washington-based artist worth $100,000. After realizing how serious the theft was the following morning, the thieves stashed the sculptures in a corn field, where three of them were accidentally destroyed during the harvest.

The Chihuly operation has also been beset by in-house theft, with employee Christopher Robert Kaul allegedly stealing $3 million-worth of glass art and reselling it at deep discounts to fund his drug addiction. The ongoing thefts went undiscovered for over a year, even after Kaul was let go due to his drug problem, due to the warehouse’s poor inventory control.

The Tacoma Art Museum’s Chihuly retrospective mostly consists of donations to the institution from the artist, according to a statement on the exhibition website. “His gifts to the museum’s permanent collection represent the artist’s recognition of the importance of his hometown as a constant source of inspiration and support throughout his career.”

source:artnet

David Hockney & Massimo Vitali – For The Love Of Pools

David Hockney, Portrait of Nick Wilder (1966).Image: Courtesy of Richard Gray Gallery.

Aching for the perfect poolside scene to hang on your wall? Here, we take a look at two artists known for their magnificent handling of the subject: David Hockney and Massimo Vitali.

David Hockney, one of the most expensive living British artists, recently made headlines with his scathing remarks about Gerhard Richter. “To be honest, I don’t really understand Richter,” he told Monopol. “The pictures are quite nice, but also a little like the belle peinture from Paris in the 50s. And I mean that pejoratively.”

Hockney is a key figure of the Pop art movement of the 1960s and his auction records show it. His serene poolside paintings and pictures of modern houses now command millions at auction. It’s hard to believe he sold his first painting for a mere ÂŁ10.

Massimo Vitali, Pegli West (2000). Photo: courtesy of Benrubi Gallery.

Also known for his water-filled scenes is Massimo Vitali, the Italian photographer who has captures exotic and action-packed beaches around the world. His most expensive work at auction, Rosignano (diptych) (2004), fetched $151,000 at Phillips in 2008.

“Vitali’s photos are micro elements of a larger landscape he’s looking at,” said Rachel Smith of Benrubi Gallery. “It’s all about how we consume leisure and where we go en masse.”

Indeed, Vitali’s faded out pictures of the Italian seaside reflect lives lived in leisure and are great for those who enjoy staring at beautiful people sunbathing and swimming—who wouldn’t?

The 71-year-old artist has cited Gerhard Richter and the Kunstakademie DĂĽsseldorf, which Gursky attended, as his main influences. (via artnet News)

View our David Hockney & Massimo Vitali collections here & here.

Follow us & artnet News on Facebook.

Keith Haring – Fertility Suite

Keith Haring - Fertility Suite, 1983

Keith Haring – Fertility Suite, 1983

IMG_20141213_123114

The image of the pyramid – an eternal symbol of divine sublimity.

%d bloggers like this: