Expressionism

Get To Know Pop Art

You‚Äôve heard of the titans of the pop art movement ‚Äď Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol ‚Äď and will be familiar with images of Coca-Cola bottles, Marilyn Monroe and Lucky Strike packets, but far from being purely the reserve of the American art scene in the 60s and 70s, this movement spanned the globe at a time when countries and societies were reeling from the fallout from WWII, raging conflict in Vietnam and the rise and rise of Communism. Artists were uniquely placed to satirise and deride politicians, film stars – and even other artists, using humour, sex and innovation to provoke, parody and¬†reflect‚Ķ

Marcello Nitsche I Want You 1966

To the outside world, many of the artists in The EY Exhibition:¬†The World Goes Pop existed on the peripheries of the movement; of course Warhol made the news with headline grabbing quotes ‚Äď and continues to be the poster boy for all things Pop to this day ‚Äď but many artists working across Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and Asia were hugely prolific in their own countries, and proved the movement was not just American, British or male. Many brought together for the first time, their significance is now re-examined in an explosion of visual¬†stimulation.

Body Politics

Numerous artists created work that examined and questioned depictions of the female body in art and popular culture. Instead of being a purely ‚Äėdecorative‚Äô element of a composition, the female body emerged throughout the 60s and 70s as a legitimate tool of protest and empowerment. The body was being reclaimed. No longer merely fetishised and glossy, there were uncomfortable questions being asked of its role in visual culture and mass¬†media.

Evelyne Axell Valentine 1966

Artists such as Evelyne Axell (who for a time showed under the gender-ambiguous name Axell) challenged that it now stood for power, liberation and equality. Introduced to painting by family friend René Magritte, Axell’s 1966 work Valentine was produced as a homage to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman to go in to space (and also the first civilian). By attaching a helmet and zip to the canvas, Axell invites her viewer to peek through the zipper at the flesh beneath. Acutely aware of a woman’s reception in a male-dominated industry, her work frequently challenged perceptions of images of the female body and sexuality. Despite achieving a feat of daring exploration and discovery, many only commented on Tereshkova’s physical appearance. To further highlight this absurdity, Axell staged a Happening in which a model performed a reverse strip-tease; starting naked apart from an astronaut’s helmet and adding layers of clothing as the performance went on, to the delight of the assembled crowd. Catalan artist Mari Chordà also explored anatomy in Coitus Pop 1968, by abstracting the sexual organs in a burst of enamelled colour on wood Рgraphic shapes and unmistakably phallic.

Mari Chorda Coitus Pop enamel paint on wood

In Anna Maria Maiolino’s striking Glu Glu Glu 1966, we stare straight down the throat of our subject, and below her disembodied head lie brightly coloured intestines. She is female, but anonymous. The body parts are recognisable, but disconnected from the whole. It’s beautifully constructed using quilted fabric, which should be soft and tactile, but used to make glossy internal organs it becomes repulsive, visceral and unsettling.

Anna Maria Maiolino Glu Glu Glu painted quilted fabric Pop Art

War and Peace

Far from being purely about consumer habits and radical new fashion, pop art was a vehicle for artists to comment on political events and recent history. Nothing was off limits; Joan Rabascall‚Äôs Atomic Kiss was made as part protest, part warning sign; whilst America fought in Vietnam, the very real threat of an impending world war terrified a generation who were living through vicious conflict. Sex and death are uncomfortable bedfellows, and he describes his motivation for using found imagery: ‚Äėwhat was important, I believe, was to get away from abstract art, which was very present in galleries, and do something that was corresponding to the time in which we were living‚Äô. Read the full¬†interview

Joan Rabascall Atomic Kiss Pop Art collage

America‚Äôs influence on fashion, art, music, and technology around the world of course couldn‚Äôt be denied, but a number of artists commented on this imperialism by depicting the American flag or President Kennedy ‚Äď whose assassination in 1963 rocked the United States to the core, but the ripples were felt globally. Often these motifs were adopted with a fascination in the materials, processes and subject matters employed by Rauschenberg, Wesselman and their peers. A truly international society opened up with the advent of cheaper air travel and imported television and films.¬†Other nations felt connected and invested in these news reports, and as such America‚Äôs agenda also belonged to the rest of the world.¬†The Vietnam War was firmly in the sights of Finnish artist Reimo Reinikainen, with his series reworking the Stars and¬†Stripes.

Reimo Reinikainen Sketch 4 for the US Flag

Japanese artist¬†Keiichi¬†Tanaami¬†became obsessed with movies, television and adverts as a young boy growing up in Tokyo, watching up to 500 hundred films in one year. He himself has drawn comparisons with his work and that of Warhol ‚Äď citing him as a huge influence after a visit to New York in the 1960s. With Japan still reeling from the atomic bomb attack in 1945, Tanaami turned his sights on the culture that was rebuilt in the aftermath of tragedy, and he still draws on this when making art: ‚ÄėToday, I still create works that deal with my experience of war as a child. This moment of fear that a whole city can disappear just within a moment is a memory that has been recorded deep in my mind; it does not go away‚Äô. Read the full¬†interview

Keiichi Tanaami film still from Commercial War

Strength in Numbers

Included in the exhibition are several works by groups of artists working under one name. Highly politicised, after years of civil war and living under General Franco‚Äôs regime, Joan Cardells and Jorge Ballester formed Equipo Realidad in Valencia in 1966. Far from an introspective viewpoint, they explored Spain‚Äôs heritage and cultural traditions, whilst examining them through the lens of modern society, developing as all other European territories were, at rapid speed. They used found imagery and appropriated them or referenced it in their paintings, such as Robert Capa‚Äôs iconic photograph of a Spanish resistance fighter,¬†Falling Soldier, and Leonardo da Vinci‚Äôs Vitruvian Man in¬†Divine Proportion¬†1967. Though they made work in Spain, Cardells said ‚Äėour work was closely tied to current international events, more than national or local ones, because of censorship. We were cautious because censorship was watching us: we had a problem with a serigraphy of Che Guevara. But the critical stance was always above the local or the general‚Äô. Read the full interview.

Equipo Realidad Divine Proportion Vitruvian Man da Vinci

Another group, Equipo Cr√≥nica, comprised of Rafael Solbes, Manuel Valdes and Juan Antonio Toledo was also operating in Valencia at the same time, forming in 1964 and also closely examining the changing face of the country they lived in. With a conservative fascist party in power, these groups we considered radical, and sometimes even anarchic thinkers – critical of conservative doctrines and passionate about the role played by the artist in society. They reinforce this by painting their own versions of famous Spanish paintings hailed as masterpieces the world over, such as Las Meninas, giving it a 1970s makeover, complete with patterned carpet, inflatable toys and a pot plant. Far from trivialising important motifs from Spanish culture, they focussed on the collision between past and present, and the emergence of mass-produced domestic items. In 1969 they painted Guernica ‚Äė69 made in reference to Picasso famous protest painting of the same name. Their works were figurative, referenced other famous images, popular culture and events in the political landscape in which they were living – as a means of resisting the totalitarian state of Franco‚Äôs¬†Spain.

Equipo Cronica Social Realism Pop Art in the Battle Field Comic Strip

2 by 2

The World Goes Pop features many works that deal with the idea of multiples, doubles, mirror images and diptychs, as Pop Art turned its sights to the very new concept of mass production; in homewares, cars, gadgets, fashion, music and even weapons. Source material from advertising, music and film found its way on to gallery walls as artists experimented with techniques and image manipulation like screen-printing and collage, elevating their status from the domestic and everyday, to fine art.

Kiki Kogelnik Hanging Pop Art mixed media

Dorothee Selz Relative Mimetism Woman with Boots and Lamp

Artists are uniquely placed to turn a mirror on society at large, and to broadcast back to their audience. Pop Art was something a general consumer population could relate to Рit was not elitist; it used symbols, materials, products and images that people identified with, many of them would be in the average home in their kitchen cupboard or a photograph from a newspaper article. Magazine and comic strips were widely used, and not just by Roy Lichtenstein, as the history books may have you believe. French artist Dorothée Selz mimicked poses from a magazine to create her series Relative Mimetism highlighting the convention of using the body as a sales tool and sex object, by placing the original and her version side-by-side.

Join the conversation #WorldGoesPop

Source: Think You Know Pop Art? | Tate

As Seen In The Miami Herald In 1990 & Today – How Time Flies!

Recent Acquisitions

RECENT ACQUISITIONS

Christie’s Defies Predictions of Market Chill With $138 Million Impressionist and Modern Art Sale

Lot-241

Marc Chagall Les mari√©s de la Tour Eiffel (1928) Price realized:¬£7,026,500/$10,111,134/‚ā¨ 9,260,927. Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

With art market pundits anticipating a ‚Äėchill’ in 2016, Christie’s opening salvo was conversely mild, and without too many portents of gloom. But it wasn’t on fire either. The sale realised ¬£95.9 million ($138 million), including premium, or just around the lower estimate of ¬£83.6-123 million without premium. A tolerable 22 lots, or 25 percent of the 89 lots, went unsold, including only 2 in the category of works selling for ¬£1.7 million ($2.5 million) or more. But just as many lots sold to bids either on or below the low estimates.

The sale, which included a separate catalogue for surrealist works, trailedlast February’s ¬£147 million pound sale by some margin. ‚ÄúIt wasn’t easy,” commented Guy Jennings, managing director of The Fine Art Fund Group. ‚ÄúI’d say the market has softened a bit. But it was steady.” Jay Vincze, the head of the Impressionist and modern art department at Christie’s London said the shortfall on last year was because last year he had two exceptional collections. ‚ÄúThere was no chill; this was about normal for us.”

magritte

Ren√© Magritte, Mesdemoiselles de l’Isle Adam (1942). Estimate 2,000,000 ‚Äď 3,000,000 British pounds. Price realized: ¬£1,986,500/$2,858,574/‚ā¨ 2,618,207 Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

If Christie’s were looking for some certitude in the middle market, it could be found. They had a racing start with works on paper by Pablo Picassoand Henri-Edmond Cross soaring over estimates leaving underbidders in the room‚ÄĒdealer Hugh Gibson and advisor Wentworth Beaumont‚ÄĒempty handed.

Some of the top lots were coming back to auction having sold just before the 2008 crash, so it was a test as to whether those values could be maintained. Egon Schiele‘s 1909 self-portrait oil painting had previously been in Ronald Lauder’s collection until he sold it in 2007 to help pay for his acquisition of some expensive, restituted works by Gustav Klimt for the Neue Gallerie. In 2007, it sold on a single bid for ¬£4.5 million pounds, and the buyer, a ‚Äėprivate European collector,’ was hoping for a small mark-up at ¬£6-8 million. Tuesday night, it sold for ¬£7.2 million.

Also the property of a ‚Äėprivate European collector’ was a 1925 still life by Picasso which had been bought in the same Christie’s auction for a mid-estimate of ¬£2.8 million. Christie’s had doubled the estimate this time around, to ¬£4-6 million, and it made a modest return, selling it for ¬£4 million pounds to a phone bidder against the London dealer Ezra Nahmad.

Other top lots to sell were a blissfully romantic work by Marc Chagall, Les Maries de la Tour, which clipped the top estimate selling for ¬£7 million ($10 million) to adviser Thomas Seydoux who, when he was at Christie’s, was known for his close relationships with Russian collectors. The painting last sold at auction in New York in 1991 for $600,000. And Fernand Leger’s dynamic Le Moteur, a smaller version of a painting of the same title which sold for a record $16.7 million in 2001, sold this evening to dealer, Hugh Gibson, within estimate for ¬£5.2 million.

Lot-20

Paul C√©zanne, Ferme en Normandie, √©t√© (Hattenville) (1882). Price realized: ¬£5,122,500/$7,371,278/‚ā¨ 6,751,455 Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

There was a meaty selection of early 20th¬†century German paintings byErnst Ludwig Kirchner, Lyonel Feininger, Otto Dix and more, which, except for a weak still life by Max Beckmann, sold mostly above estimates. A street scene in Murnau in 1908 by Wassily Kandinsky‚ÄĒnot long before he shifted towards abstraction, was snapped up below estimate for ¬£1.4 million by Amsterdam-based advisor Matthijs Erdman, and an early expressionistic landscape by Karl Schmidt-Rottluf, Windy Day, was chased by¬† German advisor, Jorg Bertz, before selling to a phone bidder near the top end of its estimate at ¬£1.3 million. The star of this section, though, was the relatively unknown Neue Sachlichkeit artist, Georg Scholz, with a satirical 1920s critique of small town bourgeois activities (Small Town by Day) in Germany, which quadrupled the low estimate selling to New York’s Acquavella Gallery for a record ¬£1.2 million. Christie’s saw this coming because much the same happened with a gouache study for this painting in 2012.

On the minus side was a small, rather dull Giacometti painting, Buste d’homme, which had been bought just before the credit crunch for ¬£1.6 million. Now estimated at ¬£1.8-2.5 million, it failed to find a buyer. Making losses for the sellers were a Matisse drawing, bought in New York in November 2012 for $458,500, which now sold for ¬£266,500 ($383,494), and a large jazzy canvas by Andre Lhote, Gipsy Bar, for which the owner paid a seemingly extravagant $2.7 million dollars back in 2007. That record still stands, as Gipsy Bar sold this time round for a more reasonable ¬£1.1 million ($1.9 million).

Lot-11

Christie’s had made much of the promise in Asia when touring the highlights from its sale in the East last month. But bidding from Asian collectors was muted. A verdant Farm in Normandy by Paul Cezanne (1882), sold near the low estimate for ¬£5.1 million, as did Chagall’s run-of-the-mill¬†Violinist under the Moon, which sold for ¬£1.8 million‚ÄĒboth to Asian phone bidders. The strongest Asian bidding came for an early, rather awkward looking portrait of a young man by Cezanne which was estimated at ¬£300,000, but sold for ¬£1.2 million.

The surrealist section of the sale appeared to be a bit disappointing because past sales have been getting stronger and stronger. Christie’s has built a reputation as the leading auctioneer for surrealist art under the guidance of deputy chairman, Olivier Camu, who is also a specialist in the area. Last February, they chalked up 66 million pounds of sales for their Surrealist sale (over the ¬£37-54 million estimate). This evening, the level of consignments was down, with a pre-sale estimate of ¬£26-39 million, as was the total, ¬£29.5 million. Echoing Vincze, Camu said the disparity was only due to the exceptional private collection it had for sale last year, which is not something you can depend on.

benday

Salvador Dal√≠, Le voyage fantastique (1965). Estimate 1,200,000 ‚Äď 1,800,000 British pounds. Price realized: ¬£1,426,500/$2,052,734/‚ā¨ 1,880,127 ¬† Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

However, many of the lots that had higher estimates had already been at auction within the last five years, and were thus well known to buyers. The top lot, Max Ernst‘s The Stolen Mirror, an homage to his former lover, Leonora Carrington, set a record $16.3 million (¬£10.3 million) when it sold for four times the lower estimate to a European collector at Christie’s New York in November 2011. That collector must have needed to sell and been prepared to take a loss as he secured a guarantee from Christie’s, most probably near the lower end of the¬† ¬£7-10 million estimate. But bidding was thin on Tuesday and the painting fell to a lone telephone bidder‚ÄĒlikely the guarantor‚ÄĒfor a premium inclusive ¬£7.6 million.

Also taking a loss was Christie’s. Rene Magritte’s 1947 painting,Mesdesmoiselles de l’Isle Adam, which is simultaneously delightful and scary, sold at Christie’s New York in November 2014 below estimate for $4.3 million dollars. The painting had a third party guarantee, but had somehow managed to become property of Christie’s (i.e., the guarantee didn’t materialize). Now with a lower ¬£2-3 million estimate, it sold for ¬£2 million ($2.86 million), with Christie’s having to shoulder the difference.

Lot-311-445x1024

Egon Schiele, Selbstbildnis mit gespreizten Fingern (1909). Price realized: ¬£7,250,500/$10,433,470/‚ā¨ 9,556,159. Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

The other Christie’s owned property, Joan Miro’s Femme et Oiseau dans la Nuit, 1968, carried the second highest estimate of the surrealist sale at ¬£3-5 million, down on the ¬£4-6 million it carried in¬† June 2010 when it sold for ¬£5.2 million. Although it had not been guaranteed, it was not paid for. Fortunately for Christie’s, there was plenty of bidding on it the second time around, spurred first by London dealer Angela Nevill, and then by Ezra Nahmad, before it sold to a phone bidder for ¬£5.8 million, just enough to get Christie’s out of jail.

Another of the higher valued lots that had been at auction relatively recently was Salvador Dal√≠‘s Le Voyage Fantastique, a 1965 portrait of movie star, Raquel Welch, that blended sci-fi elements with a Lichtenstein-like benday-dot technique. This obviously appealed to the Mugrabi family of art dealers when they bought it in 2011 in New York for a mid-estimate $1.9 million. With a similar estimate of ¬£1.2-1.8 million, it might have tempted one of the Asian buyers who have taken¬†Dal√≠ to¬†heart, but it sold on a ¬£1.2 million bid ($1.7 million), and not to an Asian collector, leaving the Mugrabis unusually short on a deal.

source via: artnet

Pop culture graphic artist Peter Max debuts exclusive key art for The Voice

Famed illustrator and graphic artist¬†Peter Max, known for his signature psychedelic style and pop¬†culture drawings,¬†has¬†designed key art to celebrate the show‚Äôs upcoming season of NBC’s The Voice.

A cultural icon whose work spans four decades, Max‚Äôs groundbreaking art has been seen everywhere from the outside of a Boeing 747 to the pages of Life magazine. And drawing the Voice judges isn‚Äôt exactly out of his wheelhouse: Max previously painted portraits of pop sensation Taylor Swift, based on the debut of her 2008 album ‚ÄúSpeak Now.‚ÄĚ

With paintings on exhibition in hundreds of museums and galleries worldwide, Peter Max and his vibrant colors have become part of the fabric of contemporary culture. Max has been successively called a Pop Icon, Neo Fauvist, Abstract Expressionist and the United States ‚ÄúPainter Laureate.‚ÄĚ

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Check out Gallery Art’s collection of Peter Max artwork throughout the decades:

Untitled-1

Untitled-2Untitled-3Untitled-4

Happy (88th) Birthday Alex Katz!

GallArt.com Wants To Wish A Very Happy Birthday To One Of The GREAT Masters of Art! Alex Katz!

Alex Katz, 2004. Photograph by Vivien Bittencourt.

Alex Katz, 2004. Photograph by Vivien Bittencourt.

Pas de Deux 5

Pas de Deux 5

Black Hat (Nicole)

Black Hat (Nicole)

Grey Dress

Grey Dress

Grey Ribbon

Grey Ribbon

Sweatshirt II

Sweatshirt II

Katz has received numerous accolades throughout his career. In 2007, he was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy Museum, New York. In 2005, Katz was the honored artist at the Chicago Humanities Festival‚Äôs Inaugural Richard Gray Annual Visual Arts Series. The same year, he was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Colgate University, Hamilton, New York‚ÄĒ his second Honorary Doctorate, following one from Colby College, Maine, in 1984. Katz was named the Philip Morris Distinguished Artist at the American Academy in Berlin in 2001 and received the Cooper Union Annual Artist of the City Award in 2000. In addition to this honor from Cooper Union, in 1994, his alma mater created the Alex Katz Visiting Chair in Painting with the endowment provided by the sale of ten paintings donated by the artist. Katz was inducted by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1988. In 1987 he was the recipient of the Pratt Institute‚Äôs Mary Buckley Award for achievement and also received the Queens Museum of Art Award for Lifetime Achievement. The Chicago Bar Association honored Katz with the Award for Art in Public Places in 1985. In 1978, Katz received the U.S. Government grant to participate in an educational and cultural exchange with the USSR. Katz was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship for Painting in 1972.

Works by Alex Katz can be found in over 100 public collections worldwide. Most notably, those in America include: Albright-Knox Museum, Buffalo; The Art Institute of Chicago; The Brooklyn Museum; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; Des Moines Art Center; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; The Los Angeles County Museum of Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Milwaukee Art Museum; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, D.C.; National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Museum of Art; the Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford; and The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Additionally, Katz’s work can be found in the Albertine Graphische Sammelung (Austria), the Atenium Taidemuso (Finland), the Sara Hildén Art Museum (Finland), the Bayerische Museum (Germany), the Berardo Collection (Portugal), the Essl Collection (Austria), the French National Collection, the Israel Museum, IVAM Centre Julio Gonzalez (Spain), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Japan), Museum Moderne Kunst (Austria), the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Spain), the Nationalgalerie (Germany), the Saatchi Collection (England), and the Tate Gallery (England), among others.

In 1968, Katz moved to an artists’ cooperative building in SoHo, where he has lived and worked ever since. He continues to spend his summers in Lincolnville, Maine.(via AlexKatz.com)

David Hockney & Massimo Vitali – For The Love Of Pools

David Hockney, Portrait of Nick Wilder (1966).Image: Courtesy of Richard Gray Gallery.

Aching for the perfect poolside scene to hang on your wall? Here, we take a look at two artists known for their magnificent handling of the subject: David Hockney and Massimo Vitali.

David Hockney,¬†one of the most expensive living British artists, recently made headlines with¬†his scathing remarks about Gerhard Richter. “To be honest, I don’t really understand Richter,” he told Monopol. “The pictures are quite nice, but also a little like the belle peinture from Paris in the 50s. And I mean that pejoratively.”

Hockney is a key¬†figure of the Pop art movement of the 1960s and his auction records show it. His serene poolside paintings and pictures of modern houses¬†now command¬†millions at auction. It’s hard to believe he sold his first painting for a mere ¬£10.

Massimo Vitali, Pegli West (2000). Photo: courtesy of Benrubi Gallery.

Also known for his water-filled scenes is Massimo Vitali, the Italian photographer who has captures exotic and action-packed beaches around the world. His most expensive work at auction, Rosignano (diptych) (2004), fetched $151,000 at Phillips in 2008.

“Vitali’s photos are micro elements of a larger landscape he’s looking at,” said Rachel Smith of Benrubi Gallery. “It’s all about how we consume leisure and where we go en masse.”

Indeed, Vitali’s faded out pictures of the Italian seaside reflect lives lived in leisure and are great for those who enjoy staring at beautiful people sunbathing and swimming‚ÄĒwho wouldn’t?

The 71-year-old artist has cited Gerhard Richter and the Kunstakademie D√ľsseldorf, which Gursky attended, as his main influences. (via artnet News)

View our David Hockney & Massimo Vitali collections here & here.

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