art news

Farewell to a Major Figure of Geometric Abstraction and Concrete Art

 

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François Morellet died on Wednesday, just a few days after his 90th birthday. Parisian gallerist Kamel Mennour confirmed the French artist’s passing to Le Monde. Morellet is known primarily as a major figure of geometric abstraction and Concrete Art, working across mediums including painting, sculpture, and light-based art. Though he began working in the 1950s, the artist has explained that he had to wait decades before his neon works became in-demand enough to sell. Morellet was a central player in the founding of the significant Paris collective of the 1960s Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel (GRAV).

Some 60 years after his practice began, Morellet received a major retrospective at the Center Pompidou in Paris, cementing his place in the country as one of the key artists of his generation.

Stolen Picasso – When You’re So Rich You Don’t Notice Your Picasso Is Missing

 

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Gallery Art owner Kenneth Hendel holds on tightly to Picasso’s ‘Portrait de Marie-Therese’ at his gallery in Aventura on Wednesday, April 20, 2016. Hendel received a letter from a New York law firm saying that the Picasso in his gallery was stolen ten years ago from the Tisch family and they just noticed it was missing now. The gallery owner contends he bought the art from another dealer – paid $350,000 for it ‚ÄĒ and that he knows nothing about it being stolen.
PATRICK FARRELL pfarrell@miamiherald.com

As Seen In The Miami Herald In 1990 & Today – How Time Flies!

Christie’s Defies Predictions of Market Chill With $138 Million Impressionist and Modern Art Sale

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Marc Chagall Les mari√©s de la Tour Eiffel (1928) Price realized:¬£7,026,500/$10,111,134/‚ā¨ 9,260,927. Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

With art market pundits anticipating a ‚Äėchill’ in 2016, Christie’s opening salvo was conversely mild, and without too many portents of gloom. But it wasn’t on fire either. The sale realised ¬£95.9 million ($138 million), including premium, or just around the lower estimate of ¬£83.6-123 million without premium. A tolerable 22 lots, or 25 percent of the 89 lots, went unsold, including only 2 in the category of works selling for ¬£1.7 million ($2.5 million) or more. But just as many lots sold to bids either on or below the low estimates.

The sale, which included a separate catalogue for surrealist works, trailedlast February’s ¬£147 million pound sale by some margin. ‚ÄúIt wasn’t easy,” commented Guy Jennings, managing director of The Fine Art Fund Group. ‚ÄúI’d say the market has softened a bit. But it was steady.” Jay Vincze, the head of the Impressionist and modern art department at Christie’s London said the shortfall on last year was because last year he had two exceptional collections. ‚ÄúThere was no chill; this was about normal for us.”

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Ren√© Magritte, Mesdemoiselles de l’Isle Adam (1942). Estimate 2,000,000 ‚Äď 3,000,000 British pounds. Price realized: ¬£1,986,500/$2,858,574/‚ā¨ 2,618,207 Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

If Christie’s were looking for some certitude in the middle market, it could be found. They had a racing start with works on paper by Pablo Picassoand Henri-Edmond Cross soaring over estimates leaving underbidders in the room‚ÄĒdealer Hugh Gibson and advisor Wentworth Beaumont‚ÄĒempty handed.

Some of the top lots were coming back to auction having sold just before the 2008 crash, so it was a test as to whether those values could be maintained. Egon Schiele‘s 1909 self-portrait oil painting had previously been in Ronald Lauder’s collection until he sold it in 2007 to help pay for his acquisition of some expensive, restituted works by Gustav Klimt for the Neue Gallerie. In 2007, it sold on a single bid for ¬£4.5 million pounds, and the buyer, a ‚Äėprivate European collector,’ was hoping for a small mark-up at ¬£6-8 million. Tuesday night, it sold for ¬£7.2 million.

Also the property of a ‚Äėprivate European collector’ was a 1925 still life by Picasso which had been bought in the same Christie’s auction for a mid-estimate of ¬£2.8 million. Christie’s had doubled the estimate this time around, to ¬£4-6 million, and it made a modest return, selling it for ¬£4 million pounds to a phone bidder against the London dealer Ezra Nahmad.

Other top lots to sell were a blissfully romantic work by Marc Chagall, Les Maries de la Tour, which clipped the top estimate selling for ¬£7 million ($10 million) to adviser Thomas Seydoux who, when he was at Christie’s, was known for his close relationships with Russian collectors. The painting last sold at auction in New York in 1991 for $600,000. And Fernand Leger’s dynamic Le Moteur, a smaller version of a painting of the same title which sold for a record $16.7 million in 2001, sold this evening to dealer, Hugh Gibson, within estimate for ¬£5.2 million.

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Paul C√©zanne, Ferme en Normandie, √©t√© (Hattenville) (1882). Price realized: ¬£5,122,500/$7,371,278/‚ā¨ 6,751,455 Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

There was a meaty selection of early 20th¬†century German paintings byErnst Ludwig Kirchner, Lyonel Feininger, Otto Dix and more, which, except for a weak still life by Max Beckmann, sold mostly above estimates. A street scene in Murnau in 1908 by Wassily Kandinsky‚ÄĒnot long before he shifted towards abstraction, was snapped up below estimate for ¬£1.4 million by Amsterdam-based advisor Matthijs Erdman, and an early expressionistic landscape by Karl Schmidt-Rottluf, Windy Day, was chased by¬† German advisor, Jorg Bertz, before selling to a phone bidder near the top end of its estimate at ¬£1.3 million. The star of this section, though, was the relatively unknown Neue Sachlichkeit artist, Georg Scholz, with a satirical 1920s critique of small town bourgeois activities (Small Town by Day) in Germany, which quadrupled the low estimate selling to New York’s Acquavella Gallery for a record ¬£1.2 million. Christie’s saw this coming because much the same happened with a gouache study for this painting in 2012.

On the minus side was a small, rather dull Giacometti painting, Buste d’homme, which had been bought just before the credit crunch for ¬£1.6 million. Now estimated at ¬£1.8-2.5 million, it failed to find a buyer. Making losses for the sellers were a Matisse drawing, bought in New York in November 2012 for $458,500, which now sold for ¬£266,500 ($383,494), and a large jazzy canvas by Andre Lhote, Gipsy Bar, for which the owner paid a seemingly extravagant $2.7 million dollars back in 2007. That record still stands, as Gipsy Bar sold this time round for a more reasonable ¬£1.1 million ($1.9 million).

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Christie’s had made much of the promise in Asia when touring the highlights from its sale in the East last month. But bidding from Asian collectors was muted. A verdant Farm in Normandy by Paul Cezanne (1882), sold near the low estimate for ¬£5.1 million, as did Chagall’s run-of-the-mill¬†Violinist under the Moon, which sold for ¬£1.8 million‚ÄĒboth to Asian phone bidders. The strongest Asian bidding came for an early, rather awkward looking portrait of a young man by Cezanne which was estimated at ¬£300,000, but sold for ¬£1.2 million.

The surrealist section of the sale appeared to be a bit disappointing because past sales have been getting stronger and stronger. Christie’s has built a reputation as the leading auctioneer for surrealist art under the guidance of deputy chairman, Olivier Camu, who is also a specialist in the area. Last February, they chalked up 66 million pounds of sales for their Surrealist sale (over the ¬£37-54 million estimate). This evening, the level of consignments was down, with a pre-sale estimate of ¬£26-39 million, as was the total, ¬£29.5 million. Echoing Vincze, Camu said the disparity was only due to the exceptional private collection it had for sale last year, which is not something you can depend on.

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Salvador Dal√≠, Le voyage fantastique (1965). Estimate 1,200,000 ‚Äď 1,800,000 British pounds. Price realized: ¬£1,426,500/$2,052,734/‚ā¨ 1,880,127 ¬† Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

However, many of the lots that had higher estimates had already been at auction within the last five years, and were thus well known to buyers. The top lot, Max Ernst‘s The Stolen Mirror, an homage to his former lover, Leonora Carrington, set a record $16.3 million (¬£10.3 million) when it sold for four times the lower estimate to a European collector at Christie’s New York in November 2011. That collector must have needed to sell and been prepared to take a loss as he secured a guarantee from Christie’s, most probably near the lower end of the¬† ¬£7-10 million estimate. But bidding was thin on Tuesday and the painting fell to a lone telephone bidder‚ÄĒlikely the guarantor‚ÄĒfor a premium inclusive ¬£7.6 million.

Also taking a loss was Christie’s. Rene Magritte’s 1947 painting,Mesdesmoiselles de l’Isle Adam, which is simultaneously delightful and scary, sold at Christie’s New York in November 2014 below estimate for $4.3 million dollars. The painting had a third party guarantee, but had somehow managed to become property of Christie’s (i.e., the guarantee didn’t materialize). Now with a lower ¬£2-3 million estimate, it sold for ¬£2 million ($2.86 million), with Christie’s having to shoulder the difference.

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Egon Schiele, Selbstbildnis mit gespreizten Fingern (1909). Price realized: ¬£7,250,500/$10,433,470/‚ā¨ 9,556,159. Image: Courtesy of Christie’s

The other Christie’s owned property, Joan Miro’s Femme et Oiseau dans la Nuit, 1968, carried the second highest estimate of the surrealist sale at ¬£3-5 million, down on the ¬£4-6 million it carried in¬† June 2010 when it sold for ¬£5.2 million. Although it had not been guaranteed, it was not paid for. Fortunately for Christie’s, there was plenty of bidding on it the second time around, spurred first by London dealer Angela Nevill, and then by Ezra Nahmad, before it sold to a phone bidder for ¬£5.8 million, just enough to get Christie’s out of jail.

Another of the higher valued lots that had been at auction relatively recently was Salvador Dal√≠‘s Le Voyage Fantastique, a 1965 portrait of movie star, Raquel Welch, that blended sci-fi elements with a Lichtenstein-like benday-dot technique. This obviously appealed to the Mugrabi family of art dealers when they bought it in 2011 in New York for a mid-estimate $1.9 million. With a similar estimate of ¬£1.2-1.8 million, it might have tempted one of the Asian buyers who have taken¬†Dal√≠ to¬†heart, but it sold on a ¬£1.2 million bid ($1.7 million), and not to an Asian collector, leaving the Mugrabis unusually short on a deal.

source via: artnet

Closure of Miami Causeway Threatens Traffic Mayhem at Art Basel in Miami Beach

Could this year’s Art Basel in Miami Beach see the worst traffic ever for the famously hectic art fair week? The city’s famously clogged roads¬†are going to be even worse this December¬†thanks to the closure of the Venetian Causeway.

One of three passages between Miami Beach and Miami, the Venetian Causeway helps relieve congestion on the MacArthur Causeway to the south or the Julia Tuttle Causeway to the north. Visitors to Art Basel in years past need no reminder of how difficult it can be to get from Miami Beach to say, the Pérez Art Museum Miami, or Wynwood when traffic slows to a crawl on the causeways.

The nine-month, $12.4-million project, which began in late May, will rebuild the causeway’s western drawbridge. Built in 1927, the historic span was¬†patched with metal plates during a renovation in the late 1990s. The need for a better solution became clear in March 2014, when a plate was dislodged¬†and a bus became stuck in the gap.

The city is offering other transit options, which will include water taxis as well as a free trolley service running along the length of Miami Beach that connects the main convention center to the Design District.

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Miami trolley route. Photo: courtesy Miami Beach.

The city is also testing out a new¬†“Miami-Dade Art Express” bus route, which is also free. Running every 20 minutes between 11:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m., the bus will provide an alternate mode of transportation across the Julia Tuttle Causeway.

Nick Korniloff, head of two fairs in Miami (Art Miami and its sister fair¬†CONTEXT) and one in Miami Beach (Aqua Art Miami), is hopeful that the effects of the closure won’t be too dramatic. “The Venetian was convenient up until a point,” he told artnet News via e-mail, “but never came close to being able to handle the bulk of traffic that the interstates [on the other causeways] do.”

Free Miami trolley. Photo: via Wikimedia Commons.

Free Miami trolley. Photo: via Wikimedia Commons

Man Arrested for Destroying $120,000 Dale Chihuly Sculpture

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A 43-year-old man has been arrested and charged with¬†smashing a $120,000 Dale Chihuly sculpture. The piece was on view at the artist’s¬†retrospective¬†in his hometown at the Tacoma Museum of Art¬†in Washington.

The incident took place on Friday, while the exhibition was closed. The suspect is believed to have knocked over¬†Chihuly‘s¬†Gilded Lavender Ikebana with Lapis Stem and Two Leaves, shattering the delicate blown glass.

Dale Chihuly, Gilded Lavender Ikebana with Lapis Stem and Two Leaves. The sculpture was smashed by a visitor at the Tacoma Art Museum. Photo: Bruce Ikenberry Photography.

“On the video surveillance, the defendant’s arm swung forward and a large amount of breaking colored glass appears on the floor,” wrote deputy prosecutor April McComb, according to the News Tribune.

The man is being held on $20,000 bail, and has pleaded not guilty on the charge of one count of first-degree malicious mischief. He has previously been convicted of malicious mischief, second-degree robbery, and custodial assault, and has a history of felony charges from as far back as 2006.

Installation shot of the Dale Chihuly retrospective at the Tacoma Museum of Art. Photo: Tacoma Museum of Art.

The News Tribune cites court records indicating the defendant has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, antisocial disorder, and bipolar disorder. In the past, he has been involuntarily medicated in order to be able to stand trial.

After vandalizing the Chihuly sculpture, the man reportedly attempted to enter another closed exhibition before being confronted by security. He pulled a fire alarm in his rush to leave the museum, and has also been charged with sounding a false alarm.

Staff members cleaned up the shattered glass, and the museum was able to remain open the rest of the day.

Installation shot of the Dale Chihuly retrospective at the Tacoma Museum of Art. Photo: Tacoma Museum of Art.

This is not the first time Chihuly’s colorful glass artwork has been the victim of criminal activity. This past year, a group of friends scaled the walls of the Denver Botanic Gardens¬†on a drunken whim and made off¬†with four¬†pieces by the Washington-based artist worth $100,000. After realizing how serious the theft was the following morning, the thieves stashed the sculptures in a corn field, where three of them were¬†accidentally destroyed during the harvest.

The Chihuly operation has also been beset by in-house theft, with employee¬†Christopher Robert Kaul allegedly¬†stealing $3 million-worth of glass art and reselling it at deep discounts to fund his drug addiction. The ongoing thefts went undiscovered for over a year, even after Kaul was let go due to his drug problem, due to the warehouse’s poor inventory control.

The Tacoma Art Museum’s Chihuly retrospective mostly consists of¬†donations to the institution from the artist, according to a statement on the exhibition website.¬†“His gifts to the museum’s permanent collection represent the artist’s recognition of the importance of his hometown as a constant source of inspiration and support throughout his career.”

source:artnet

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