Comprehensive Retrospective Exhibition Of Joan Miro’s Work Opens At The Albertina

A visitor looks at works titled ''Lapidarium - Book of the Property of Stones'' by Spanish artist Joan Miro during a preview of the exhibition "From Earth to Sky" at the Albertina museum in Vienna. From September 12, 2014 to January 11, 2015, the museum is showing a solo exhibition on the Catalan artist and master of surrealism. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR.

A visitor looks at works titled ”Lapidarium – Book of the Property of Stones” by Spanish artist Joan Miro during a preview of the exhibition “From Earth to Sky” at the Albertina museum in Vienna. From September 12, 2014 to January 11, 2015, the museum is showing a solo exhibition on the Catalan artist and master of surrealism. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR.

VIENNA.- Catalan artist Joan Miró is the third of a series of prominent artists connected to Surrealism to become the focus of a comprehensive retrospective exhibition at the Albertina. Following exhibitions dedicated to René Magritte (2011) and Max Ernst (2013), the Albertina is now hosting an exhibition on Miró, which is part of a program on artists situated within a broad definition of Surrealism, as represented in the Albertina’s Batliner Collection . With a selection of about 100 works, including paintings, paper works and objects, the exhibition traces the theoretical and technical path of the artist, following his central motto “from earth to sky”. Like the Surrealists, Miró viewed the disjointed, post-World War Two world from a radical perspective. He was inspired by poetry, music and intuition, but, as in Surrealism, also found a point of departure for his work in his immediate surroundings. During his whole life and work, Miró was always connected to his ancestral roots, but at the same time expressed a yearning for freedom and independence, a breaking away from the constraints of background. His devotion to the Catalan landscape and a similar fascination for all things and beings formed the foundation of his work. While his paintings abound with lightness, spontaneity and poetry, they are actually the result of a deliberate working method and an affinity for the natural and original. Although he was initially criticized by André Breton, the leading theorist of Surrealism, for his “naive“ and “intellectually limited vision of art”, it was precisely this approach which made Miró’s work appear so unburdened. Miró had cleared his perception and recognized that this child-like vision could provide the basis for serious discussion and an equally limitless and attentive fascination for all things. Similar to so many creative paths, that of Catalan artist Miró was spurred on and shaped by a clash of opposites. This driving force, which is repeatedly stressed and perceptible in his work, was nourished by impulses from his experiences of alternating life in the country and the city – a traveler between his country house in Montroig, Tarragona, and the calm of then unspoilt Mallorca, and the visually and acoustically overwhelming, yet intellectually enriching, urban life of Paris and Barcelona. (Read the full article here)
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