Alexander Calder Occident, 1975 Gouache and ink on paper 29 x 43 inches (73.6 x 109.2 cm) © 2014 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alexander Calder
Occident, 1975
Gouache and ink on paper
29 x 43 inches (73.6 x 109.2 cm)
© 2014 Calder Foundation, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

ALEXANDER CALDER
Gouaches
8 May – 14 June 2014

What I produce is not precisely what I have in mind—but a sort of sketch, a man-made approximation. That others grasp what I have in mind seems unessential … as long as they have something else in theirs.
—Alexander Calder

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of Alexander Calder’s gouache paintings on paper. The exhibition is in two parts, the first in New York and the second in London.

In the late 1920s, Calder’s new method of sculpting—bending and twisting wire to “draw” three-dimensional figures in space—resonated with both early Conceptual and Constructivist art, as well as the language of early abstract painting. Seeking to capture the constant motion of life, he created kinetic sculptures in which flat, abstract shapes in light sheet metal, painted in a restricted palette of black, white, or bright primary colors, hang in perfect balance from wires. Marcel Duchamp was the first to describe the new works as “mobiles,” while his later standing “stabiles” employed welding and bolting techniques to reject the weight and solidity of sculptural mass, to produce forms that were both linear and planar, open and suggestive of motion. By 1950, Calder had achieved international renown, affording him opportunities to engineer his sculpture on a monumental scale. (Via ARTnews.com)

View our amazing Alexander Calder collection here.